Milwaukee to Host Second Public Meeting on Progress to Restore Great Lakes

Picture of Sally Cole-Misch
Sally Cole-Misch
IJC
October 11, 2016
Milwaukee waterfront on Lake Michigan

The IJC’s primary role under the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement is to determine and report on the effectiveness of progress by Canada and the United States to restore and protect the Great Lakes. This includes obtaining public input on that progress and recommending further actions the two countries should take.

Our upcoming meeting in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on Tuesday, Oct. 18, is part of efforts to talk with citizens about their perceptions of the successes, challenges and opportunities for Great Lakes restoration. The governments hosted a Great Lakes Public Forum in Toronto on Oct. 4-6 to highlight their work and present a progress report. The IJC held a public comment session as part of the Forum as well as an evening public meeting to talk about the greater Toronto region and Lake Ontario.

You can watch that conference and share your thoughts and questions with others by going to the IJC’s online democracy site, ParticipateIJC, and read a summary of those meetings in November’s Great Lakes Connection newsletter.

The Lake Michigan waterfront and Milwaukee skyline. Credit: Todd Bragstad
The Lake Michigan waterfront and Milwaukee skyline. Credit: Todd Bragstad

Why come to Milwaukee? First, the IJC wants to provide the same opportunity to residents on the western side of the basin to comment on progress as those on the eastern side. Second, because the city and surrounding communities have dealt with several issues relevant to the Agreement’s goals and objectives, we want to learn more about the successes, challenges and opportunities they’ve faced. Our host, the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee’s School of Freshwater Sciences, houses much of the latest research being completed on key topics relevant to the Agreement.

Everyone is welcome to participate in the meeting, which will start at 6:30 p.m. CST at the School of Freshwater Sciences. After local organizations, scientists and citizens summarize the key issues they’re addressing in the greater Milwaukee region, we’ll broaden the discussion to consider how these local successes and challenges can be applied to Lake Michigan and beyond. We’ll finish with time for general comments about progress under the Agreement.

In addition to talking with the IJC, all of our public meetings also provide the opportunity to connect with other citizens, organizations, scientists and policymakers who are concerned and committed to restoring and protecting their part of the Great Lakes.

Register for the meeting today and join us for an informative conversation about Milwaukee, Lake Michigan and the Great Lakes.

See also: Scientific Institute of the Month: School of Freshwater Sciences

The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee’s School of Freshwater Sciences will host the IJC’s public meeting on Oct. 18. Credit: UWM
The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee’s School of Freshwater Sciences will host the IJC’s public meeting on Oct. 18. Credit: UWM

 

Picture of Sally Cole-Misch
Sally Cole-Misch
IJC

Sally Cole-Misch is the public affairs officer for the IJC’s Great Lakes Regional Office.