ECOLOGICAL BENEFITS OF
CONTAMINATED SEDIMENT
REMEDIATION IN THE
GREAT LAKES BASIN

Prepared by: Michael A. Zarull, John H. Hartig, and Lisa Maynard
Sediment Priority Action Committee
Great Lakes Water Quality Board

August, 1999


TABLE OF CONTENTS

List of Tables and Figures
Foreword
I. Executive Summary
II. Introduction
III. Contaminated Sediment in the Great Lakes
IV. Contaminated Sediment and the Aquatic Environment
Ecological Effects of Contaminated Sediment
Sediment Remediation and Ecological Improvements
V. Sediment Remediation in the Great Lakes
VI. Case Studies of Sediment Remediation and Associated Ecological Benefits
PCB Contaminated Sediment Remediation in Waukegan Harbor
PAH Contaminated Sediment Remediation in the Main Stem, Black River
Existing Links Between Contaminated Sediment and Ecological Damage
VII. Conclusions and Recommendations
VIII. Literature Cited
IX. Appendix A - Sediment Priority Action Committee Membership


List of Tables and Figures

Table 1. Ecological performance use impairments potentially associated with contaminated sediment and the number of Areas of Concern where these impairments have been found
Table 2. A breakdown of sediment remediation projects in Great Lakes Areas of Concern
Table 3. Qualitative comparison of PCB levels in Waukegan Harbor fish
Table 4. PAH concentrations (mg/kg) in Black River sediment in 1980 (during coke plant operations), 1984 (coking facility closed, pre-dredging), and 1992 (post-dredging)

Figure 1. Great Lakes Basin Areas of Concern
Figure 2. Trends in sediment remediation in Great Lakes Areas of Concern: A. Cumulative number of sediment remediation projects; B. Cumulative financial resources expended on sediment remediation; and C. Cumulative volume of sediment removed
Figure 3. Outboard Marine Corporation site before remedial action
Figure 4. Average PCB levels, with 95% confidence intervals, in Waukegan Harbor carp fillets
Figure 5. Percentage of age 3 brown bullheads from the Black River having various liver lesions