Table 5 - Sources of B(a)P Emissions in the Great Lakes Basin (tonnes)

Source / Sector

U.S. Data (2) (U.S. GL States)

Canadian Data (1) (Ontario)

 

Quantity*

%

Quantity

%

Residential wood combustion1

57.4

57

6.8

44.7

Blast furnaces and steel mills

Coke production / coke ovens

12.7

13

3.6

23.7

Creosote treated wood

-

-

2.3

15.1

Wildfires

-

-

1.5

9.9

Prescribed burning

-

-

0.2

1.3

Petroleum refining

17.8

18

0.72

4.6

Motor vehicles

 

 

 

 

Mobile sources3

(on road)

(non-road)

-

-

-

-

0.2

-

1.3

-

Scrap tire burning

-

-

-4

0

Kraft pulp & paper production

-

-

-

-

Publicly owned treatment works

6.7

7

-

-

Chemical manufacturing

-

-

0.0

0

Commercial meat charbroiling

-

-

-

-

Other Sources5

4.8

5

-

-

Total6

99.4

 

15.2

 

*

U.S. quantities (originally in pounds) were converted to tonnes.

Data Sources:

(1)

Emissions are based on 2000 data. Benazon Environmental Inc. Benzo(a)Pyrene and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Sources, Regulations and Programs for the Ontario Great Lakes Basin 1988, 1998, and 2000. Draft Report (No. 1). Prepared for Toxics Prevention Division, Environmental Protection Service - Ontario Region, July 13, 2000, p.10.

(2)

Emissions estimates are based on 1996 data. Great Lakes Commission, 1996 Inventory of Toxic Air Emissions Part II: Mobile Sources, Submitted to U.S. EPA Region 5, February 2000, p.28.

Notes:

% =

% of total emissions

1

Residential wood combustion includes wood burned in fireplaces, wood stoves, furnaces, and fireplace inserts.

2

Since no actual B(a)P air release data are available for Ontario's refineries, emission factors were used to estimate a high and a low release (0.00 to 1.30 tonnes/year). Until actual B(a)P release data are available for these facilities, the average release of 0.65 tonnes/year has been used in Ontario’s inventory, which has been rounded up to 0.7 tonnes/year in the table.

3

Mobile sources include on-road highway vehicles (e.g. gasoline- and diesel-powered trucks and vehicles), non-road sources (e.g. agricultural, construction, and industrial equipment and vehicles, marine vessels, and pleasure craft), aircraft and locomotives.

4

Although not an accepted or legal practice, tire burning / fires can occur at locations where tires are stockpiled (no release estimate available).

5

Other sources of B(a)P include open barrel trash burning.

6

Quantities may not add up to match total due to rounding.